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  February is
National Pet Dental Month


To celebrate Pet Dental Health Month, as well as promote good dental hygiene as a preventive step in your pet's well-being, we are offering 20% Off Dental Cleanings for the entire month of February 2015.

Does Your Cat's or Dog's Breath Smell Bad?

One of the most important and easily neglected areas of your pet is their mouth. Just like in our mouths, bacteria and other germs can accumulate on the teeth or in the gums, and travel to other parts of your pet's body.

If the bacteria gets trapped in the kidneys, a kidney infection will result. This can also occur in the liver and the heart. These infections are often difficult to detect and can vary from a nuisance to a life threatening medical problem.

There are two easy ways to check on your pet's oral health:

  1. Dog BreathUse your sense of smell. A dog's breath, while never as sweet as a "Pepsodent Smile," should not be offensive, sour, or even strong. If their breath is offensive in any way, your pet probably has dental disease.

  2. Look at the teeth, especially the ones in the back of the mouth. Teeth should be shiny and white. Gums should be pink, with no redness where they touch the teeth. If the teeth are stained, usually a tan to gold color, or the gums appear red, your pet has dental disease. In either case, you owe your pet a visit to the veterinarian.

Treatment involves a dental cleaning, treatment of any diseased teeth or gums, and then prevention to slow down the process that causes the disease.

Dental disease is inevitable, but we can slow it down quite a bit. Methods include feeding a dental diet, many of which are in the supermarket, brushing, mouth rinses, and encouraging your dog to chew on bones or dental toys. Your veterinarian can discuss which option would be best for your pet.

Don't ignore dental disease. Many clients make the mistake of waiting until their pet's next physical exam. This can be a mistake that can cause many problems including loss of teeth and even internal disease. Dental disease really needs to be treated when it is there, not later on.

I would like to see all dog and cat foods include dental cleaning as one of their traits, but the pet food companies are slow to respond to this very important issue.